Czar of Noir Attending TCMFF

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FNF president Eddie Muller will be presenting films again at this year’s TCM Classic Film Festival, April 28 – May 1. Eddie will be introducing two FNF restorations, Los tallos amargos and Repeat Performance (1947). He will also be introducing Carl Reiner’s comic valentine to film noir, Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid (1982). The film features a series of clips from famous film noirs, intercut with new footage of a hard-boiled detective (Steve Martin) and a possible femme fatale (Rachel Ward) to form a new and suitably convoluted noir plot. The film was the last project of both costume designer Edith Head and composer Miklós Rózsa. Eddie will also be introducing a series of critically acclaimed sports films, including John Huston’s Fat City (1972), based on Leonard Gardner’s 1969 gut wrenching novel about small hall boxing.

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This year’s overarching theme is Moving Pictures, focusing on the films that, “bring us to tears, rouse us to action, inspire us, even project us to a higher plane.” These films range from Carl Theodor Dreyer’s silent classic The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) accompanied by a live orchestra and vocalists performing Richard Einhorn’s oratorio Voices of Light, a piece specifically written for this purpose in 1994, to John Singleton’s heartbreaking Boyz in the Hood (1991), a semi-autobiographical depiction of African-American youths struggling with gang violence in South Central L.A., with a soundtrack of rap songs by Run-D.M.C., 2 Live Crew and Ice Cube reflective of the characters’ lives.

Communal Viewing: TCM Classic Film Festival

Jules Dassin’s Rififi (1955)

TCM CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL 2015
March 26-29
Hollywood, CA

 

The TCM Classic Film Festival returns to Hollywood March 26-29, providing a chance for fans to watch cinematic classics the way they were meant to be seen—on the big screen, with an audience. This year’s theme History According to Hollywood explores how the dream factory’s portrayal of history shapes our view of it. Besides a diverse array of films depicting historical events and characters like 1776 (1972) and Patton (1970), four restorations will make their world premieres at the festival, including Jules Dassin’s beautifully wrought and highly influential heist film Rififi (1955), presented by Film Noir Foundation president Eddie Muller, who is hosting at least 10 films.

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Tyrone Power and Joan Blondell share a steamy moment in Nightmare Alley (1947).

Noir lovers have plenty to enjoy, including the Film Noir Foundation-funded 35mm restoration of Too Late for Tears (1949), hosted by Muller. As part of the festival’s “Discoveries” program, TCM will screen Nightmare Alley (1947), featuring Tyrone Power’s uncharacteristically dark performance as a ruthless carny. Legendary character actor Norman Lloyd will join Muller for a discussion following Anthony Mann’s Reign of Terror (1949). Set in the bloody days of the French Revolution, the film is a rare example of a historically-based noir. TCM also tips its hat to the master of suspense, Alfred Hitchcock, with screenings of Rebecca (1940) and Psycho (1960). Muller will also be hosting Nightmare and Rebecca, Shaun of the Dead director Edgar Wright will be in attendance at Psycho. For more on the festival, visit the official website.

International Noir Returns to Roxie

Midcentury Productions (Don Malcolm) and I Wake Up Dreaming (Elliot Lavine) have combined forces to expose audiences to the international noir movement that flourished after WWII and continued well past Hollywood’s noir era. A RARE NOIR IS GOOD TO FIND will present 15 noirs March 19-23 at San Francisco’s Roxie Theatre. France, Hong Kong, Finland, Japan, Denmark, Mexico, Greece, Brazil, Poland, and Korea are all represented in the festival. As well as spanning continents, the films in the festival span decades with release dates ranging between 1949 and1974. Jules Dassin’s 1974 Greek produced noir The Rehearsal (I dokimi) reflects the increasing political bent of the films of the era with its examination/recreation of a massacre of Athenian college students by the Greek junta performed on a darkly lit New York sound-stage. Film scholar and FNF Board of Directors member Foster Hirsch will interview one of the film’s ensemble cast members, Stathis Giallelis, following the screening on March 22. For a complete line up of films visit the official website.